What's the closest thing to a diamond?

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Mason Klocko asked a question: What's the closest thing to a diamond?
Asked By: Mason Klocko
Date created: Mon, Jan 25, 2021 8:01 AM
Date updated: Fri, Jul 15, 2022 6:30 PM

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Top best answers to the question «What's the closest thing to a diamond»

Moissanite. Moissanite is a form of silicon carbide and is usually produced synthetically. Because of its hardness (9.5 on the Mohs scale), it is perhaps the diamond imitation material that is closest to the real thing in terms of durability.

  • Moissanite. Moissanite was first discovered in 1893 by a French scientist named Henri Moissan, who later won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry…
  • Sapphire…
  • Aquamarine…
  • Morganite…
  • Emerald…
  • Ruby…
  • Amethyst.

18 other answers

Cubic Zirconia. The second best diamond alternative, cubic zirconia (or CZ) is a diamond simulant that’s very popular in modern jewelry designs. Cubic zirconia is, in fact, lab-grown zirconium dioxide and is often regarded as visually similar to real diamonds.

It’s true. Moissanite reflects light splendidly. When white light passes through an inclined surface, it splits into rainbow colors; this dispersion is called a gem’s fire. Moissanite has twice the dispersion of diamonds, and of the mineral-based gemstones, only a diamond is harder than moissanite.

Not to be confused with synthetic cubic zirconia, zircon is a natural mineral. With its excellent brilliance and dispersion, it has a long history as a diamond simulant. In terms of appearance, zircon comes closer to diamond than any other mined gemstone. However, in terms of durability, it’s far more fragile.

What are the different Colours of diamonds? Diamonds occur in a variety of colors—steel gray, white, blue, yellow, orange, red, green, pink to purple, brown, and black. Colored diamonds contain interstitial impurities or structural defects that cause the coloration; pure diamonds are perfectly transparent and colorless.

Separating a diamond look-alike from the real thing is one of the biggest challenges a new gemologist faces. Diamonds and their simulants can share some optical and physical properties. However, two properties, specific gravity and birefringence, hold the key to distinguishing diamonds. In the chart below, you’ll find common diamond look-alike stones and real diamonds arranged by specific ...

Cubic zirconia and similar materials like moissanite are considered diamond “simulants.”. They look virtually identical to real diamonds to the naked eye, but are composed of a different substance. The advantage of “CZ” (and other simulants) is that it’s significantly cheaper than real diamonds.

Moissanite is a form of silicon carbide and is usually produced synthetically. Because of its hardness (9.5 on the Mohs scale), it is perhaps the diamond imitation material that is closest to the real thing in terms of durability.

A new synthetic diamond that currently is only available in the United States, the diamond nexus is also created in a lab. It is the closest stone to real diamonds on the market: It is almost as hard as a diamond, can cut glass and has almost the identical brightness.

Smaller accent diamonds are much more affordable than larger center diamonds, so surrounding your smaller center diamond with accent diamonds creates a dazzling look for less. One great option is a halo engagement ring , which features a center gemstone completely encircled by sparkling diamond accents that make the center gem appear larger.

Separating a diamond look-alike from the real thing is one of the biggest challenges a new gemologist faces. Diamonds and their simulants can share some optical and physical properties. However, two properties, specific gravity and birefringence, hold the key to distinguishing diamonds. In the chart below, you’ll find common diamond look-alike ...

Cubic zirconia and similar materials like moissanite are considered diamond “simulants.”. They look virtually identical to real diamonds to the naked eye, but are composed of a different substance. The advantage of “CZ” (and other simulants) is that it’s significantly cheaper than real diamonds.

Moissanite is a form of silicon carbide and is usually produced synthetically. Because of its hardness (9.5 on the Mohs scale), it is perhaps the diamond imitation material that is closest to the real thing in terms of durability.

A new synthetic diamond that currently is only available in the United States, the diamond nexus is also created in a lab. It is the closest stone to real diamonds on the market: It is almost as hard as a diamond, can cut glass and has almost the identical brightness.

It’s true. Moissanite reflects light splendidly. When white light passes through an inclined surface, it splits into rainbow colors; this dispersion is called a gem’s fire. Moissanite has twice the dispersion of diamonds, and of the mineral-based gemstones, only a diamond is harder than moissanite.

Not to be confused with synthetic cubic zirconia, zircon is a natural mineral. With its excellent brilliance and dispersion, it has a long history as a diamond simulant. In terms of appearance, zircon comes closer to diamond than any other mined gemstone. However, in terms of durability, it’s far more fragile.

What are the different Colours of diamonds? Diamonds occur in a variety of colors—steel gray, white, blue, yellow, orange, red, green, pink to purple, brown, and black. Colored diamonds contain interstitial impurities or structural defects that cause the coloration; pure diamonds are perfectly transparent and colorless.

Smaller accent diamonds are much more affordable than larger center diamonds, so surrounding your smaller center diamond with accent diamonds creates a dazzling look for less. One great option is a halo engagement ring, which features a center gemstone completely encircled by sparkling diamond accents that make the center gem appear larger. Another great option is a three stone setting, featuring one smaller gem on each side of the center diamond.

Separating a diamond look-alike from the real thing is one of the biggest challenges a new gemologist faces. Diamonds and their simulants can share some optical and physical properties. However, two properties, specific gravity and birefringence, hold the key to distinguishing diamonds. In the chart below, you’ll find common diamond look-alike ...

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