Why do fast cooling crystals end up small?

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Bessie Terry asked a question: Why do fast cooling crystals end up small?
Asked By: Bessie Terry
Date created: Fri, Aug 6, 2021 3:37 AM
Date updated: Sun, Jul 3, 2022 6:27 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Why do fast cooling crystals end up small»

When magma cools, crystals form because the solution is super-saturated with respect to some minerals. If the magma cools quickly, the crystals do not have much time to form, so they are very small. If the magma cools slowly, then the crystals have enough time to grow and become large.

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When magma cools, crystals form because the solution is super-saturated with respect to some minerals. If the magma cools quickly, the crystals do not have much time to form, so they are very small. If the magma cools slowly, then the crystals have enough time to grow and become large. Some granites contain minerals which are up to one meter (3 ...

Why do fast cooling crystals end up small? When magma cools, crystals form because the solution is super-saturated with respect to some minerals. If the magma cools quickly, the crystals do not have much time to form, so they are very small. If the magma cools slowly, then the crystals have enough time to grow and become large.

Igneous rocks that are allowed to cool more slowly form larger crystals, while igneous rocks that cool quickly form smaller crystals. It is simply a matter of time. The longer it takes for magma to cool, the more time is allowed for the crystals to form. The crystal size in igneous rock formations is directly related to the cooling time of the ...

The texture of an igneous rock (fine-grained vs coarse-grained) is dependent on the rate of cooling of the melt: slow cooling allows large crystals to form, fast cooling yields small crystals. Magmas and their resultant plutonic rock bodies cool and crystallize slowly and are characterized by coarse-grained texture, in which the mineral crystals are visible to the unaided eye.

In cases where cooling happens relatively quickly, individual plagioclase crystals can be zoned from calcium-rich in the centre to more sodium-rich around the outside. This occurs when calcium-rich early-forming plagioclase crystals become coated with progressively more sodium-rich plagioclase as the magma cools.

Depending on the shape of and simplicity of these unit cells, you can grow crystals in different crystal forms by changing the cooling rates, the rate at which certain elements diffuse through the liquid phase to the crystallizing crystal edges, as well as other mechanisms of crystal growth. A salt crystal ends up always cubic, because that’s how NaCl just cryst

Modelling the cooling of magma. You may have done an experiment at school with a substance called salol. If molten salol cools slowly, you get big crystals. If it cools quickly, you get small ...

The chilled solution is then filtered to isolate the pure crystals and the crystals are rinsed with chilled solvent. This first series of diagrams shows what happens if you let a crystallization proceed slowly: first by setting the flask at room temperature undisturbed until crystals form, and then carefully on ice. The red bar to the right of each image is a thermometer, to indicate the temperature.

An igneous rock with large crystals embedded in a matrix of much finer crystals is indicative of a two-stage cooling process, and the texture is porphyritic (Figure 3.3.7). For the rock to be called “porphyritic” there has to be a significant difference in crystal size, where the larger crystals are at least 10 times larger than the average size of the smaller crystals.

Also, larger crystals have a smaller surface area to volume ratio, leading to a higher purity. This higher purity is due to less retention of mother liquor which contains impurities, and a smaller loss of yield when the crystals are washed to remove the mother liquor. In special cases, for example during drug manufacturing in the pharmaceutical industry, small crystal sizes are often desired to improve drug dissolution rate and bio-availability.

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