Why does africa have so many diamonds?

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Aditya Dach asked a question: Why does africa have so many diamonds?
Asked By: Aditya Dach
Date created: Tue, Jun 22, 2021 1:33 PM
Date updated: Tue, Jun 28, 2022 6:19 PM

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Video answer: The story of south africa's diamonds - documentary

The story of south africa's diamonds - documentary

Top best answers to the question «Why does africa have so many diamonds»

But mainly it's because South-Africa and Africa in general have the most concentration of what we call Volcanic pipe s which are earth's pores that contain specific type of rocks called Kimberlite -the rock that transport diamonds from more than 150 Km below in earth's mantel- by eruptions that -thanks to Plate ...

Video answer: Most expensive diamonds in the world!

Most expensive diamonds in the world!

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Why are all the diamonds in Africa? Diamonds in Africa were formed somewhere between 600 million and 3 billion years ago when titanic-force pressure and heat caused carbon 1,200 miles (1,931 km) below the Earth’s surface to crystallize. As recently as a million years ago, erupting molten rock brought the diamonds closer to the Earth’s surface.

What part of Africa has the most diamonds? Top five diamond mining countries of Africa profiledBotswana. Botswana heads Africa’s list of diamond miners, housing seven well-established mines including Jwaneng, the world’s richest in terms of value, Orapa, the world’s largest by area, along with Karowe and Letlhakane.

Originally Answered: why does South Africa have so many diamonds? It is a happy coincidence of geology and Kimberlite pipe formation. There is no coincidence that the geologic place of diamond occurrence is called a Kimberlite Pipe, named after Kimberly South Africa. This all is controlled by plate tectonics and crustal-mantle geology.

Africa is rich in diamonds but still poor For months now, Africa's rough diamonds have been increasing in value but the sale proceeds do not reach the people. Instead, they benefit metropolitan...

Georges Gobet/AFP/ Getty Images Diamonds in Africa were formed somewhere between 600 million and 3 billion years ago when titanic-force pressure and heat caused carbon 1,200 miles (1,931 km) below the Earth 's surface to crystallize. As recently as a million years ago, erupting molten rock brought the diamonds closer to the Earth's surface.

Official reports revealed that diamond production in overall Africa is twice as large as projected. The reason: Illegal trade, underreporting of production, corruption, and tax evasion. Initially, the former Prime Minister of Zimbabwe claims that a $15 billion missing diamond revenue story was ‘all lies’ .

This is why the blood diamonds in Africa are raising many questions and other countries’ political involvement. These conflict diamonds come from mines all over the African continent, from countries such as Liberia, Congo, Angola, Sierra Leone, and more.

Although most diamond mines are located in Africa because of the issue of conflict diamonds, there are commercial advantages for mines in politically stable countries including Canada and Australia. Examples of Diamond Mines Cullian (Premier) Mine – South Africa Image CC Cullinan (Premier) Mine, South Africa

South African diamond mines are world class in terms of their safety and environmental standards, and wages in the industry are high. South Africa is also a participant in the Kimberley Process, a global process set up by the UN to prevent ‘conflict’ diamonds from entering the mainstream diamond market.

Once a British colony, it’s no surprise that many South African diamonds made their way aboard with the biggest of them all taking its illustrious place in the crown jewels. Weighing a breathtaking 3,106 carats, this colossal diamond was discovered in 1905 by Pretoria’s Premier Mine inspector Thomas Wells, who initially mistook it as a piece of glass, placed by the miners to prank him.

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